Interview with Southeast Asia erotica author Jay Walken

Erotic Adventures in Southeast AsiaI recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jay Walken, the author of several books based in Southeast Asia that would be of interest to many of my readers. You can see a full list of his books available on Amazon by clicking here.

Where are you from?
The United States: New York.

When did you first come to Southeast Asia?
When I was 35.

When did you first procure the services of a prostitute?
I don’t use the word “prostitution” to describe every exchange of sex in return for money or some other form of reward, including a hoped for promotion. In every sex act, there is something that one partner expects from the other–whether pleasure, or a promise or hope of love, or financial security, or a long term commitment.  There are women who think like prostitutes, for whom the act is nothing but an exchange of pussy for money; I never repeat a sexual act with such a woman. But to answer your question, in my early twenties, when I was in a strange foreign city.

How has Southeast Asia changed since your first visit? How have you changed?
It has lost some of its innocence and openness, I think. I accept it for what it is: I am not as surprised as I was at first by what I found there.

What do you think about prostitution?
As I answered in the earlier question, I also think of politicians who sell their integrity for money as prostitutes, as more egregious prostitutes than those who give some happiness to lonely men.

Do you have any interest in Western women today?
Sure I do. But only a certain type.

When did you start writing, and why?
In my teens. It just came naturally to me.

What advice to you have for someone making their first trip to Southeast Asia in search of sexual services?
Turn around, unless you respect women, and can treat them as human beings, regard each person as unique.

In your opinion, what is the best book you’ve written?
Erotic Adventure in Thailand, and Milk and Pussy in Indonesia–they both have the kind of humor and occasionally inspired writing that I cherish in other writers.

What is the best book ever written about Southeast Asia and/or sex?
I can’t answer this, but “Tropic of Cancer” is a beauty.

What advice to you have to aspiring writers?
Read the kind of writers you would like to become; and also read others, be open-minded and omnivorous. Because, once you actually begin to write, you may not find much time to read other writers, or wish to lose your originality by unconsciously imitating the writers you have just read.

2 Comments

  1. Rich says:

    I have to say, I find your site so informative! Thank you so much for all the hard work, I truly hope you keep this up, I look forward to your next article!

Leave a Comment