Interview with erotic massage book author P.C. Anders

the uncensored massage erotic massage bookFollowing up on the interview I did with Southeast Asia erotica writer Jay Walken, I was able to do a question and answer session with writer P.C. Anders, author of a number of erotic massage related books that many of my readers would surely appreciate. You can see a full list of his books available on Amazon by clicking here.

Where are you from?
The United States.

When did you first visit a massage parlor?
I received a massage from a woman who visited me at my place, bringing along her massage table—that was in Long Island, New York.  Possibly the first “massage parlor” I visited, run by a Korean woman, was a few years later. It was in New York City.

If / when did you first get a “happy ending”? How did it go?
I got it from one of my first “licensed” therapists. Without asking my permission, she just picked up my penis and started running her hands up and down on it. I was surprised and just watched her do what she wanted to do, and it didn’t take long for me to ejaculate, as I had been erect for half the massage! I would say that I found half the massage to be erotic, so the happy ending was just the icing on the cake.

How has massage changed over the years? How have you changed since first getting a massage?
There are many more varieties, and it is widely available. I remember I had to search a city up and down just to find a massage therapist and get an appointment. Now, it’s a big business, and it’s more respectable, unless it’s not.

What do you think about erotic massage — ethically, legally, etc.?
I stand completely and unhesitatingly for individual freedom: so long both the giver and the receiver are consenting adults, it is no one’s business to tell them what they can and can do. But if someone claims to be giving a professional massage, they need to be trained and be up to national standards, and not simply have some certificate from some vague outfit.

What kind of women are you interested in?
All kinds, if they are interested in me. But not masculine women—if you know what I mean. I like my women to be tender, gentle, relaxed, and have a sense of humor.

What advice to you have for someone making their first trip to a massage parlor?
I give lots of detailed advice in my two big books. In addition to explaining what I came across in different countries, and the learning experiences I had, here is an entire chapter of advice. Fundamentally, you need to know something about what to expect, and make clear what you want and what you are getting. Or you might be unpleasantly surprised or disappointed.

What’s the best country for massage in your opinion?
It depends on what you’re willing to pay. If money is no object, I think London, New York, Singapore, Hong Kong—they are all good. But the best value for your money, by far: I would say—Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Cambodia. In general, Southeast Asia is such great value because of its combination of easygoing tolerance, a cultural acceptance of massage, both regular and erotic, and an abundant pool of qualified labor at low prices.

How popular are your books?
I would say “The Uncensored Massage: Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam and China,” has so far done the best, but the other books also contain gems, in my opinion.

Do you personally prefer paper or ebooks?
It’s 50-50. I love the feel of paper, I love the ability to make markings, and to take a book along with me to the beach. On the other hand, I also appreciate the advantages of just taking along a 10-ounce Kindle on a trip, and having a thousand books inside it.

What is the best book ever written about massage and/or sex?
Honestly, I have not read any book about massage that is remotely like mine. I still doubt there is anyone who has received as many massages as I have: around 4,000, I think. I would say that Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn books are among the best books I have read that combine sex with literary value, character, and observation.

What advice do you have for aspiring writers?
Follow your dream, and realize it is more important to have fun and enjoy what you do than to make money. In fact, be aware that there is no direct connection between literary quality and money.

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